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Reedops TRILOBITE Fossil Morocco 390 Million Years old #2469 1#8o

$49.99

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This is a Reedops Trilobite from Morocco, North Africa.     The trilobite measures approximately 2 1/2 inches in length and dates back to approximately 390 million years ago.   This trilobite is in the curled up position - much like the present day roly poly bugs, these trilobites could also curl up into a ball!    This is a great fossil for any collection! 

We have a variety of trilobites available so be sure to check out our other listings!  

 

 

 

I am so confident that you'll love this item that I offer a 100% money back guarantee - when you receive the item if you're not happy for any reason, send it back within 14 days and I'll refund your money. For customers in the USA, I will pay for the returned shipping as well - for international customers, returned shipping will be the responsibility of the buyer. THE MONEY BACK GUARANTEE IS NOT AVAILABLE FOR ITEMS THAT HAVE BEEN ALTERED IN ANY WAY BY THE BUYER. We are happy to combine shipping! I'm also happy to hold off on shipping if you want to watch my auctions for several weeks and then combine shipping in the same box.

 

 

PLEASE NOTE: We appreciate the business of our international customers! We request that international buyers have signature confirmation tracking or insurance on their packages. PLEASE INFORM US when you make a purchase if you would like to add signature confirmation or insurance to your order, and we can let you know what the additional cost would be. Packages may still be shipped internationally without signature confirmation or insurance, but the buyer would assume responsibility if the package was lost or stolen. The buyer is responsible for any customs or duty fees that are charged by their country.

 

THANK YOU VERY MUCH FOR LOOKING! Check out the other items in our store at http://stores.ebay.com/Fossils-Meteorites-More. Put us on your favorite sellers list and watch our auctions that end each Saturday!

 

 

Trilobite

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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For the robot vacuum cleaner, see Electrolux Trilobite.
Trilobites
Temporal range: Atdabanian Late Permian




Kainops invius
Scientific classification e
Kingdom: Animalia
Phylum: Arthropoda
Subphylum: Trilobitomorpha
Class: Trilobita
Walch, 1771[1]
Orders

Trilobites (play /ˈtrləbt/, /ˈtrɪləbt/; meaning "three lobes") are a well-known fossil group of extinct marine arthropods that form the class Trilobita. The first appearance of trilobites in the fossil record defines the base of the Atdabanian stage of the Early Cambrian period (526 million years ago), and they flourished throughout the lower Paleozoic era before beginning a drawn-out decline to extinction when, during the Devonian, almost all trilobite orders, with the sole exception of Proetida, died out. Trilobites finally disappeared in the mass extinction at the end of the Permian about 250 million years ago. The trilobites were among the most successful of all early animals, roaming the oceans for over 270 million years.[2]

When trilobites first appeared in the fossil record they were already highly diverse and geographically dispersed. Because trilobites had wide diversity and an easily fossilized exoskeleton an extensive fossil record was left behind, with some 17,000 known species spanning Paleozoic time. The study of these fossils has facilitated important contributions to biostratigraphy, paleontology, evolutionary biology and plate tectonics. Trilobites are often placed within the arthropod subphylum Schizoramia within the superclass Arachnomorpha (equivalent to the Arachnata),[3] although several alternative taxonomies are found in the literature.

Trilobites had many life styles; some moved over the sea-bed as predators, scavengers or filter feeders and some swam, feeding on plankton. Most life styles expected of modern marine arthropods are seen in trilobites, with the possible exception of parasitism (where there is still scientific debate).[4] Some trilobites (particularly the family Olenidae) are even thought to have evolved a symbiotic relationship with sulfur-eating bacteria from which they derived food.[5]